Tag Archives: relational

Moving from MySQL to Riak

April 23, 2014

Traditional database architectures were the default option for many pre-Internet use cases and architectures, such as MySQL, remain common today. However, these traditional solutions have limits that quickly become apparent as companies (and data) grow. Modern companies have changing priorities: downtime (planned or unplanned) is never acceptable; customers require a fast and unified experience; and data of all types is growing at unimaginable rates. Solutions such as Riak are designed to handle these shifting priorities.

Top Reasons to Move to Riak

  • Zero Downtime: Distributed NoSQL solutions like Riak are designed for always-on availability. This means data is always read/write accessible and the system never goes down. Downtime, planned or unplanned, can make or break a customer experience.
  • Ease-of-Scale: Traffic can be unpredictable. Businesses need to scale up quickly to handle peak loads during holidays or major releases, but then need to scale back down to save money. Riak makes it easy to add and remove any number of nodes as needed and automatically redistributes data across the cluster. Scaling up or down never needs to be a burden again.
  • Flexible Data Model: From user generated data to machine-to-machine (M2M) activity, unstructured data is now commonplace. Riak can store any type of data easily with its simple key/value architecture.
  • Global Data Locality: Every company is a global company and needs to provide consistent, low-latency experiences to everyone, regardless of physical location. Riak’s multi-datacenter replication makes it easy to set up datacenters wherever users are, for both geo-data locality and maintaining active backups.

Users That Switched to Riak

Many top companies have already moved from relational architectures to Riak. Here’s a look at a few that have made the switch.

Bump (acquired by Google)
Bump, acquired by Google in 2013, allows users to share contact information and photos by bumping two phones together. Bump uses Riak to store almost all of its user data: contacts, communications sent and received, handset information, social network OAuth tokens, etc. Bump moved from MySQL to Riak due to its operational qualities: “No longer will we have to do any master/slave song and dance, nor will we fret about performance, capacity, or scalability; if we need more, we’ll just add nodes to the cluster.” Learn more about their move in their case study.

Alert Logic
Alert Logic helps companies defend against security threats and address compliance mandates, such as PCI and HIPAA. Alert Logic switched from MySQl to Riak to collect and process machine data and to perform real-time analytics, detect anomalies, ensure compliance, and proactively respond to threats. Alert Logic processes nearly 5TB/day in Riak and has achieved performance results of up to 35k operations/second. Learn more about how Alert Logic improved performance through Riak in our blog post.

The Weather Company
The Weather Company provides millions of people every day with the world’s best weather forecasts, content and data, connecting with them through television, online, mobile and tablet screens. Riak is central to The Weather Company’s weather data services platform that delivers real-time weather services to aerospace, insurance, energy, retail, media, government, and hospitality industries. Check out our blog to see why The Weather Company selected Riak over MySQL to support their massive big data needs.

Dell
Dell uses Riak as the core distributed database technology underlying its customer cloud management solutions. Riak is used to collect and manage data associated with customer application provisioning and scaling, application configuration management, usage governance, and cloud utilization monitoring. In 2012, Enstratius (acquired by Dell) switched to Riak from MySQL in order to provide cross-datacenter redundancy, high write availability, and fault tolerance. Check out the full Enstratius case study.

Data Modeling in Riak

Riak has a “schemaless” design. Objects are comprised of key/value pairs, which are stored in flat namespaces called buckets. Below is a chart with some simple approaches to building common application types with a key/value model.

Application Type Key Value
Session User/Session ID Session Data
Advertising Campaign ID Ad Content
Logs Date Log File
Sensor Date, Date/Time Sensor Updates
User Data Login, eMail, UUID User Attributes
Content Title, Integer Text, JSON/XML/HTML Document, Images, etc.

To learn more about the benefits of Riak over relational databases, check out the whitepaper, “From Relational to Riak.” To get started with Riak, Contact Us or download it now.

Basho

A Focus on Innovation- Best Buy and Riak

January 22, 2013

Best Buy is North America’s top specialty retailer of consumer electronics, personal computers, entertainment software, and appliances. Riak has been an integral part in the transformation push to re-platform Best Buy’s eCommerce platform. Riak’s architecture has helped Best Buy build and operate its new platform with Riak playing a key role.

At our developer conference, Ricon, we were lucky to have Joel Crabb, Director of Web Architecture at BestBuy.com, talk about how Riak fits into their pattern of innovation and moving from a traditional relational architecture.


Pattern of Innovation: Riak Usage at BestBuy.com – Joel Crabb, RICON2012 from Basho Technologies on Vimeo.

To learn more about how retailers can use Riak for their eCommerce needs, check out the whitepaper, “Retail on Riak: A Technical Introduction.” For more information on moving from a relational database to Riak, sign up for our webcast this Thursday, covering advantages, tradeoffs and development considerations.

Basho

Slides- Moving from a Relational Database to Riak

January 3, 2013

Most teams considering using Riak come from a relational database background. From our webcast on moving from relational to Riak, the below slide deck covers an overview of Riak, how the architecture differs from a relational approach, the advantages for scaling and development, and what’s different about application building and database operating in a non-relational world. We also include a few stories of Riak users who replaced MySQL or added Riak to the mix.

Interested in learning more? Check out our overview, From Relational to Riak.

Basho Team

From Relational to Riak- Advantages, Tradeoffs and Considerations

December 19, 2012

We work with many people building platforms and applications on Riak that have traditionally lived on relational systems. The switch to Riak can be driven by the needs of greenfield applications and growing data volumes, business requirements around scale and availability, or the desire for operational ease and multi-site replication.

Some of the most common questions we get are from teams with a primary background in MySQL, Oracle Database or other relational systems wondering about the advantages and tradeoffs of moving to Riak. To address these common questions, we’ve written up an introductory guide on moving from relational to Riak. In it, we cover:

  • Scalability benefits of Riak, including an examination of limitations around master/slave architectures and sharding, and what Riak does differently
  • A look at the operational aspects of Riak and where they differ from relational approaches
  • Riak’s data model and benefits for developers, as well as the tradeoffs and limitations of a key/value approach
  • Migration considerations, including where to start when migrating existing applications to Riak
  • Riak’s eventually consistent design, how it differs from a strongly consistent design, and things you need to know about handling data conflicts in Riak
  • Multi-site replication options in Riak

You can download the paper here, and when you’re ready to dive deeper, check out our online documentation with more information on Riak, building applications on it, and our commercial products.

Basho Team

Monitoring Distributed Systems (New Approaches)

November 13, 2012

Legacy RDBMS systems offered mature monitoring capabilities that usually gave operators a clear view of how their databases were (or weren’t) performing. Emerging distributed systems introduce new levels of complexity, presenting new problems in monitoring and diagnosis. In this blog we highlight two talks given at last month’s RICON which shed light on this problem and offer some interesting solutions.

Next Generation Monitoring of Large Scale Riak Applications

In this talk, Theo Schlossnage, founder of OmniTI, talks about moving beyond standard monitoring metrics (average, mean, 95th percentile, 99th percentile, etc.), and advocates for more sophisticated methods, namely histograms and new visualization techniques. He illustrates this with some interesting real world examples in which metrics such as average response time have little meaning in the face of real world distributions which are often multi-modal and rapidly evolving.

Modern Radiology for Distributed Systems

In this talk, Boundary engineer Dietrich Featherston uses radiological imaging as a metaphor to explore the challenges of monitoring distributed systems –Boundary uses Riak to store high-resolution network data for its analysis engine. In this metaphor, if we just look at metrics pulled from individual hosts (CPU usage, memory usage, etc.), we can see diseased “cells”, but ignore the whole organism. We react to problems, instead of preventing them. To illustrate, Dietrich walks through a series of case studies highlighting new, “context aware”, non-invasive monitoring techniques.

For more RICON videos on a range of distributed systems topics, visit our RICON aftermath site.

From Relational to Riak (Webcast)

**January 02, 2013**

New to Riak? Thinking about using Riak instead of a relational database? Join Basho chief architect Andy Gross and director of product management Shanley Kane for an intro this Thursday (11am PT/2pm ET). In about 30 minutes, we’ll cover the basics of:

* Scalability benefits of Riak, including an examination of limitations around master/slave architectures and sharding, and what Riak does differently
* A look at the operational aspects of Riak and where they differ from relational approaches
* Riak’s data model and benefits for developers, as well as the tradeoffs and limitations of a key/value approach
* Migration considerations, including where to start when migrating existing apps
* Riak’s eventually consistent design
* Multi-site replication options in Riak

Register for the webcast [here](http://info.basho.com/RelationalToRiakJan3.html).

[Shanley](http://twitter.com/shanley)

[Andy](https://twitter.com/argv0)

NoSQL and Endless Variety

A Conversation about Variety and Making Choices

Benjamin Black stopped by the Basho offices recently and we had the chance to sit him down and discuss the collection of things that is “NoSQL.”

In this, the fifth installment of the Basho Riak Podcast, Benjamin and Basho’s CTO Justin Sheehy discuss the factors that they think should play the largest part in your evaluation of any database, NoSQL or otherwise. (Hint: it’s not name recognition.)

Highlights include why and when you might be best served improving your relational database architecture and when it might be better to use a NoSQL system like Cassandra or Riak to solve part of your problem, as well as why you probably don’t want to figure out which one of the NoSQL systems solves all of your problems.

Enjoy,

Mark



If you are having problems getting the podcast to play, click here to play in new window or right click to download the podcast.

Toward A Consistent, Fact-based Comparison of Emerging Database Technologies

A Muddle That Slows Adoption

Basho released Riak as an open source project seven months ago and began commercial service shortly thereafter. As new entrants into the loose collection of database projects we observed two things:

  1. Widespread Confusion — the NoSQL rubric, and the decisions of most projects to self-identify under it, has created a false perception of overlap and similarity between projects differing not just technically but in approaches to licensing and distribution, leading to…
  2. Needless Competition — driving the confusion, many projects (us included, for sure) competed passionately (even acrimoniously) for attention as putative leaders of NoSQL, a fool’s errand as it turns out. One might as well claim leadership of all tools called wrenches.

The optimal use cases, architectures, and methods of software development differ so starkly even among superficially similar projects that to compete is to demonstrate a (likely pathological) lack of both user needs and self-knowledge.

This confusion and wasted energy — in other words, the market inefficiency — has been the fault of anyone who has laid claim to, or professed designs on, the NoSQL crown.

  1. Adoption suffers — Users either make decisions based on muddled information or, worse, do not make any decision whatsoever.
  2. Energy is wasted — At Basho we spent too much time from September to December answering the question posed without fail by investors and prospective users and clients: “Why will you ‘win’ NoSQL?”

With the vigor of fools, we answered this question, even though we rarely if ever encountered another project’s software in a “head-to-head” competition. (In fact, in the few cases where we have been pitted head-to-head against another project, we have won or lost so quickly that we cannot help but conclude the evaluation could have been avoided altogether.)

The investors and users merely behaved as rational (though often bemused) market actors. Having accepted the general claim that NoSQL was a monolithic category, both sought to make a bet.

Clearly what is needed is objective information presented in an environment of cooperation driven by mutual self-interest.

This information, shaped not by any one person’s necessarily imperfect understanding of the growing collection of data storage projects but rather by all the participants themselves, would go a long way to remedying the inefficiencies discussed above.

Demystification through data, not marketing claims

We have spoken to representatives of many of the emerging database projects. They have enthusiastically agreed to participate in a project to disclose data about each project. Disclosure will start with the following: a common benchmark framework and benchmarks/load tests modeling common use cases.

    1. A Common Benchmark Framework — For this collaboration to succeed, no single aspect will impact success or failure more than arriving at a common benchmark framework.

At Basho we have observed the proliferation of “microbenchmarks,” or benchmarks that do not reflect the conditions of a production environment. Benchmarks that use a small data set, that do not store to disk, that run for short (less than 12 hours) durations, do more to confuse the issue for end users than any single other factor. Participants will agree on benchmark methods, tools, applicability to use cases, and to make all benchmarks reproducible.

Compounding the confusion is when benchmarks are used for comparison of different use cases or was run on different hardware and yet compared head-to-head as if the tests or systems were identical. We will seek to help participants run equivalent on the various databases and we will not publish benchmark results that do not profile the hardware and configuration of the systems.

  1. Benchmarks That Support Use Cases — participants agree to benchmark their software under the conditions and with load tests reflective of use cases they commonly see in their user base or for which they think their software is best suited.
  2. Dissemination to third-parties — providing easy-to-find data to any party interested in posting results.
  3. Honestly exposing disagreement — Where agreement cannot be reached on any of the elements of the common benchmarking efforts, participants will respectfully expose the rationales for their divergent positions, thus still providing users with information upon which to base decisions.

There is more work to be done but all participants should begin to see the benefits: faster, better decisions by users.

We invite others to join, once we are underway. We, and our counterparts at other projects, believe this approach will go a long way to removing the inefficiencies hindering adoption of our software.

Tony and Justin