Tag Archives: Basho

Basho is Taking Over Baltimore This Weekend

September 29, 2010

Basho hackers will be giving quite a few presentations between now and the end of the week. And they all happen to be in Baltimore! Here is a quick rundown (in no particular order) of where we will be, who will be there, and what we will be talking about:

Rusty Klophaus at CUFP

Rusty Klophaus will be at the Commercial Users of Functional Programming (CUFP) Event taking place this weekend in Baltimore, Maryland. His talk is called “Riak Core: Building Distributed Applications Without Shared State” and it should be downright amazing.

From the talk’s description: Both Riak KV (a key-value datastore and map/reduce platform) and Riak Search (a Solr-compatible full-text search and indexing engine) are built around a library called Riak Core that manages the mechanics of running a distributed application in a cluster without requiring a central coordinator or shared state. Using Riak Core, these applications can scale to hundreds of servers, handle enterprise-sized amounts of data, and remain operational in the face of server failure.

All the details on his talk can be found here.

And, in case you haven’t been following your Riak Core developments, check out Building Distributed Systems with Riak Core.

Dave Smith at the Ninth ACM SIGPLAN Erlang Workshop

Dave Smith (a.k.a “Dizzyd”) will be keynoting the ACM SIGPLAN Erlang Workshop taking place on Friday, Sept 30th, also in Baltimore. Dave’s talk is called “Rebar, Bitcask and how chemotherapy made me a better developer.”

Rebar and Bitcask are both pieces of software that Dizzy had a major hand in creating and they have played a huge role in Riak’s adoption (not to mention that Rebar has quickly become an indispensable tool for Erlang developers everywhere). Dave was also fighting follicular lymphoma while writing a lot of this code. Needless to say, this one is sure to be memorable and of immense value.

More details on his talk can be found here.

It should also be noted that newly-minted Basho Developer Scott Fritchie is the Workshop Chair for this event. He is an accomplished Erlang developer and Riak is not the only distributed key/value store about which Scott is passionate – he will also happily talk your ear off about Hibari.

Justin Sheehy at Surge

Just when you thought they couldn’t fit another conference in Baltimore on the same weekend… And this one is big: it’s the Surge Conference put on by the team at OmniTI. Basho will be there in the form of CTO Justin Sheehy.

Justin will be giving a talk about concurrency at scale, something about which every distributed systems developer should care deeply. Additionally, he will be taking part in a panel discussion – I haven’t seen an official name for it yet but rumor has it that it’s something along the lines of “SQL versus NoSQL.”

Check out the Surge site for more conference details.

As you can see, Baltimore is the place to be this weekend. Get there at all costs. And then go download Riak.

Mark

A New Community Editor – Marten Gustafson

September 1, 2010

Community Editors are non-Basho developers who have edit permissions on the Riak Wiki. How do you become one? Check out the Community Processes Section on the Riak Wiki for details.

We added a new Community Editor this week. His name is Mårten Gustafson.

Aside from being involved in putting a Riak application into production, Mårten has been active, knowledgeable and helpful on the Riak Mailing list and in the IRC Room (where he goes by the unassuming “chids”). He recently came forward and expressed interest in being a Community Editor, and based on his Riak credentials, the team here at Basho was more than happy to bring him aboard.

Welcome, Mårten! We are looking forward to your contributions.

If you’re interested in being a Community Editor for the Riak Wiki, let us know. We would love to talk to you.

Best,

Mark

Basho Technologies, Inc. Closes $2 Million Series C Preferred Equity Financing, Continues Innovative Growth Strategy

Funding will accelerate already rapid market adoption of Riak, Basho’s industry transforming distributed database software.

CAMBRIDGE, MA – August 9, 2010 – Basho Technologies, Inc. today announced it has secured $2 million from a diverse collection of angel investors in a Series C preferred equity financing. Eschewing traditional early-stage funding sources in the venture capital industry, Basho instead cultivated a network of entrepreneurial angels with an appetite for disruptive technologies like Riak who were eager to fill the post- economic collapse investment gap. The company forecasts this financing will carry it to profitability by mid-2011.

“We have an innovative product in Riak so it is only fitting we have pursued a similarly innovative financing strategy,” said Earl Galleher, Chairman and CEO of Basho. “We have been fortunate to find a network of angels who understand our market and value what we have accomplished to date. Our investors have given us the time and opportunity to fully develop our product vision and to prove our market plan.”

Founded in 2008 by former Akamai Technologies (NASDAQ: AKAM) executives and senior engineers, Basho designed Riak to free corporations from the constraints of traditional, highly centralized database architectures (like those offered by Oracle, IBM, Microsoft, etc.). Enterprises like Comcast, Wikia Inc., Mochi Media, and Vibrant Media use Riak not just as an alternative to traditional databases but as the cornerstone for previously uncontemplated application architectures.

“In the late 1990s, the founders of Akamai solved the complex problem of a growing Internet by allowing anyone with a website to efficiently distribute content around the world on any network,” continued Mr. Galleher. “Ten years later, we are doing something similar but with a much more complex and expensive problem, the database
itself. We and our investors believe Riak will rapidly transform the entire database industry.”

Applications built with Riak can sustain catastrophic server, data center, and network failures without outages while avoiding the complexity and expense that characterize applications built using traditional, highly centralized databases. Optimized for the emerging class of “cloud” infrastructure, organizations building applications using Riak can scale out dynamically to handle sudden surges in load and scale back when load decreases to reduce expenses.

About Basho Technologies

Basho Technologies, Inc., founded in January 2008 by a core group of software architects, engineers and executive leadership from Akamai Technologies, Inc. (Nasdaq: AKAM) is headquartered in Cambridge, Massachusetts. Basho produces Riak, a distributed data store that combines high availability, easily-scalable capacity and throughput, and ease of use. Riak’s high availability data store means that applications built using Riak remain both read and write available under almost any operational conditions and without requiring intervention. Available in both an open source and a paid commercial version, Riak provides unprecedented read- and write-availability to web, mobile, and enterprise applications.

Media Contacts
Earl Galleher
CEO, Basho Technologies, Inc.
910.520.5466
earl@basho.com

Basho Partners with Joyent to Bring You Hosted Riak

August 8, 2010

This is a huge day for Basho Technologies, Riak, and our growing community of users.

We are thrilled to announce Basho’s partnership with Joyent to bring our community hosted Riak on Joyent’s Smart platform. With both open source and enterprise versions available, anyone can quickly spin up a Riak cluster and start building applications.

When we first began talking to Jason and David and the rest of the Joyent team early this year, we realized we shared a common vision for the future of infrastructure. The past several months have been spent finalizing the details, and in just a few weeks you’ll be able to go to my.joyent.com and, with a few clicks, purchase and deploy as many nodes of Riak you want, need, and can handle.

Making pre-configured Riak SmartMachines available in the Joyent cloud will enable developers to combine all the benefits of Riak with the proven, advanced hosting platform that businesses like LinkedIn, Gilt, and Backstage rely on every day.

Mark your calendar, because hosted Riak is here!

Thanks,

Earl

Wikia, Inc. Selects Riak, a Next-Generation Distributed Data Store from Basho Technologies, Inc.

CAMBRIDGE, MA – August 3, 2010 – Basho Technologies today announced Wikia, Inc. has selected Riak, Basho’s next-generation distributed data store, as the foundation for a new set of global services. Wikia is the 70th largest site on the Internet according to Quantcast and brings millions of people together daily to create and discover engaging content. Wikia selected Riak over traditional databases and other emerging data storage technologies to distribute its data around the world and bring it closer to its global audience.

“Riak has allowed us to do something that was impossible before,” said Artur Bergman, Wikia’s Vice President of Engineering and Operations. “With Riak we can break through the ceiling on performance imposed by traditional database technologies and continue to improve the experience of our users. We invest in technology that benefits Wikia’s growing user base, therefore Riak made perfect sense. Riak is fast, easy to run, and extremely resilient to the failure scenarios anyone with real operational experience knows are all too common.”

Founded in 2008 by former Akamai Technologies (NASDAQ: AKAM) executives and senior engineers, Basho designed Riak to provide the same high availability and rapid scaling properties provided by leading content delivery networks. Applications built with Riak can sustain catastrophic server, data center, and network failures without outages, while avoiding the complexity and expense that characterize applications built using traditional databases.

“Basho is excited to have a respected and forward-looking client like Wikia so readily embrace Riak,” said Earl Galleher, Basho’s Chairman and CEO. “More and more, we see companies reject the limitations of traditional databases like Oracle and MySQL in favor of Riak’s flexibility and ease of use. Riak doesn’t just solve problems for organizations running applications on old database architectures; it frees them to build entirely new classes of applications.”

Wikia intends to deploy a replicated user session service running simultaneously in three data centers in the U.S. and Europe, replacing its current solution which is restricted to a single data center. Mr. Bergman has already contributed a file system adapter to the Riak open source community which will be used in the Wikia production environment.

“We did not set out to build a disruptive technology. We simply wanted to solve a problem faced by anyone running old database technologies,” said Mr. Galleher. “We have only scratched the surface of what Riak can do.”

About Wikia

Wikia, founded by Wikipedia founder Jimmy Wales and Angela Beesley, is the place where millions of passionate people come to discover, create, and share an abundance of information on thousands of topics. Wikia sites are written by community members that are deeply excited and knowledgeable about subjects ranging from video games, television shows, and movies to food, fashion, and environmental sustainability. With over four million pages of content and 150,000 enthusiast communities, Wikia attracts more than 30 million unique global visitors per month and has been listed in the Quantcast top 100 sites on the Internet since early 2009.

About Basho Technologies

Basho Technologies, Inc., founded in January 2008 by a core group of software architects, engineers, and executive leadership from Akamai Technologies, Inc. (Nasdaq:AKAM – News), is headquartered in Cambridge, Massachusetts. Basho produces Riak, a distributed data store that combines extreme fault tolerance, rapid scalability, and ease of use. Designed from the ground up to work with applications that run on the Internet and mobile networks, Riak is particularly well-suited for users of cloud infrastructure such as Amazon’s AWS and Joyent’s Smart platform and is available in both an open source and a paid commercial version. Current customers of Riak include Comcast Corporation, MIG-CAN, and Mochi Media.

Media Contacts
Earl Galleher
CEO, Basho Technologies, Inc.
910.520.5466
earl@basho.com

Consistent Smashing

July 28, 2010

Sometimes you need more than words to illustrate a point. Here is Basho’s humble attempt to clarify the difference between “Dynamo-Style” systems (like Riak) that use consistent hashing to achieve fault tolerance, simple scaling, and prevent data loss, and systems that use techniques like sharding.

Enjoy!

Mark

Consistent Smashing from Basho Technologies on Vimeo.

Riak in Production – Lexer

July 21, 2010

A few members of the Basho Team are at OSCON all week. We are here to take part in the amazing talks and tutorials, but also to talk to Riak users and community members.

Yesterday I had the opportunity to have a brief chat with Andrew Harvey, a developer who hails from Sydney, Australia and works for a startup called Lexer. They are building some awesome applications around brand monitoring and analytics, and Riak is helping in that effort.

In this short clip, Andrew gives me the scoop on Lexer and shares a few details around why and how they are using Riak (and MySQL) at Lexer.

(Deepest apologies for the shakiness. I forgot the Tripod.)

Enjoy!

Mark

Riak in Production – Lexer from Basho Technologies on Vimeo.

Basho West and the Riak One Year Anniversary

July 19, 2010

Basho is growing. Fast. We are adding customers and users at a frenetic pace, and with this growth comes expansion in both team and locations. As some of you may have noticed, the Basho Team is not only becoming larger but more distributed. We now have people in six states scattered across four time zones pushing code and interacting with clients everyday.

First Order of Business

To bolster this growth and expansion, we did what any self-respecting tech startup would do: we opened an office in San Francisco. Several members of the Basho Team recently moved into a space at 795 Folsom, a cozy little spot a mere five floors below Twitter. (Proximity to the Nest was a requirement when evaluating office space.) We are calling it “Basho West.” There are four of us here, and we are settling in quite nicely.

If you are in the area and want to talk Riak, Basho, open source, coffee, etc., stop in and pay us a visit any time. Seriously. If you walk through the door of Suite 1028 with a Mac Book in hand and have a question about how to model your data in Riak, we’ll get out the whiteboard and help you out.

Second Order of Business

To make an immediate impact in the Bay Area, we thought it would be a great idea to get the first regularly scheduled Riak Meetup off the ground. We heard a rumor that there were a lot of people using or interested in databases out here, so we feel obliged to join the conversation. Here is the link to the San Francisco Riak Meetup group. If you’re in the Bay Area and want to meet with other like-minded developers and technologists to discuss Riak (and other database technologies) in every possible capacity, please join us.

Third Order of Business

Pop quiz: When did Basho Technologies open source Riak? We asked ourselves this the other day. As far we can tell, it was sometime during the first week and a half of August last year. “Huh,” we thought. “Wouldn’t it be great to have a little gathering to commemorate this event?” It sure would, so that’s what we are doing.

I mentioned above that we are starting a regularly scheduled Riak Meetup. To us, it made perfect sense to combine the inaugural Meetup with the event to celebrate Riak’s One Year Anniversary of being a completely open source technology.

The date of this gathering is Monday, August 9th. The exact time and location still needs to be solidified. We’ll be announcing that within the next few days. But put it on your calendar now, as you will not want to miss this. In addition to food, drink, and exceptional overall technical discussion and fireworks, here is what you can expect:

  • A talk from Dr. Eric Brewer, Basho Board Member and Father of the CAP Theorem
  • A few words from the team at Mochi Media about their experiences running Riak in production
  • A short talk from Basho’s VP of Engineering, Andy Gross, on the state of Riak and the near term road map

If you have any other suggestions about what you would like to see at this event, just leave us a message or an idea on the Meetup page linked above.

Let’s review:

  1. Come visit the new Basho Office at 795 Folsom, Suite 1028
  2. Join the Riak Meetup Group
  3. Come be a part of the Riak One Year Anniversary Celebration

And stay tuned, because things are only going to get more exciting from here.

The Basho Team

Basho Headed to OSCON and Community Leadership Summit

July 16, 2010

Basho is sending some team members to Portland to take part in the two great events happening up there over the next week. Antony Falco, Mark Phillips (that’s me) and John Hornbeck will be in “Stumptown” starting today for the Community Leadership Summit and OSCON. (We’ll be landing at around 9PST if you want to meet us at PDX with welcome signs.)

If you would like to meet-up or want to say “hi” leave a comment, message us on Twitter, or email riak@basho.com.

We’ll have shirts and stickers with us, too, so if you would like to get your hands on some Riak swag make sure to get in touch. I’ll also be staggering around with a video camera, looking to interview anyone who has used or ever thought about using Riak or any other piece of Basho software. Users beware…

See you there!

Mark

Erlang Factory London Recap

June 14, 2010

This was originally posted by @rklophaus on his blog, rklophaus.com.

Erlang Factory London gathers Erlang pioneers from across the world—Berlin to Boston, Krakow to Cordoba, and San Francisco to Shanghai—for a two-day conference of innovative Erlang development.

The summaries below are just a small sampling of the talks at Erlang Factory London. There were three tracks running back-to-back for two days, and I often couldn’t decide which of the three to attend. Slides and videos will be released by Erlang Solutions, and can be found under individual track pages on the Erlang Factory website.

Day 1 – June 10, 2010

Opening Session

Francesco Cessarini (Chief Strategy Officer, Erlang Solutions Ltd.), began the conference with a warm welcome and a quick review of progress made by Erlang-based companies in the last year.

Some highlights:

The History of the Erlang Virtual Machine – Joe Armstrong, Robert Virding

Joe Armstrong and Robert Virding gave a colorful, back-and-forth history of the Erlang’s birth and early years. A few notable milestones and achievements:

  • Joe’s early work on reduction machines. Robert’s complete rewrite of Joe’s work. Joe’s complete rewrite of Robert’s work. (etc.)
  • How Erlang was almost based on Smalltalk rather than Prolog
  • The quest to make Erlang 1.0x 80 times faster
  • Experiments with different memory management and garbage collection schemes
  • The train set used demonstrate Erlang, now in Robert’s basement
  • The addition of linked processes, distribution, OTP, and bit syntax

It’s easy to take a language like Erlang for granted and assume that its builders followed some well-known, pre-ordained path. Hearing Erlang’s history from two of its main creators provided an excellent reminder that building software is both an art and a science, uncertain and exciting like any creative process.

Riak from the Inside – Justin Sheehy

Justin Sheehy (CTO of Basho Technologies) opened his talk by introducing Riak, “a scalable, highly-available, networked, open-source key/value store.” He then very quickly announced that he wasn’t there to talk about using Riak, he was there to talk about how Riak was built using Erlang and OTP

There are eight distinct layers involved in reading/writing Riak data:

  • The Client Application using Riak
  • The client-side HTTP API or Protocol Buffers API that talks to the Riak cluster
  • The server-side Riak Client containing the combined backing code for both APIs
  • The Dynamo Model FSMs that interact with nodes using Dynamo style quorum behavior and conflict resolution
  • Riak Core provides the fundamental distribution of the system (not covered in the talk)
  • The VNode Master that runs on every physical node, and coordinates incoming interaction with individual VNodes
  • Individual VNodes (Virtual Nodes) which are treated as lightweight local abstractions over K/V storage
  • The swappable Storage Engine that persists data to disk

During his talk, Justin discussed each layer’s responsibilities and interactions with the layers above and below it.

Justin’s main point is that carefully managed complexity in the middle layers allows for simplicity at the edge layers. The top three layers present a simple key/value interface, and the bottom two layers implement a simple key/value store. The middle layers (FSMs, Riak Core, and VNode Master) work together to provide scalability, replication, etc. Erlang makes this possible, and was chosen because it provides a platform that evolves in useful and relatively-predictable ways (this is a good thing, a surprising evolution is bad).

Mnesia for the CAPper – Ulf Wiger

Ulf Wiger (CTO of Erlang Solutions) discussed where Mnesia might fit into the changing world of databases, given the new focus on “NoSQL” solutions. Ulf gave a quick introduction to ACID properties, Brewer’s CAP theorem, and the history of Mnesia, and then dove into a feature level description/comparison of Mnesia with other databases:

  • Deployed commercially for over 10 years
  • Comparable performance to current top performers clustered SQL space
  • Scalable to 50 nodes
  • Distributed transactions with loose time limits (in other words, appropriate for transactions across remote clusters)
  • Built-in support for sharding (fragments)
  • Incremental backup

The downsides are:

  • Erlang only interface
  • Tables limited to 2GB
  • Deadlock prevention scales poorly
  • Network partitions are not automatically handled, must recombine tables automatically

Ulf and others have done work to get around some of these limitations. Ulf showed code for an extension to Mnesia that automatically merges tables after they have split, using vector clocks.

Riak Search – Rusty Klophaus

I presented Riak Search, a distributed indexing and full-text search engine built on (and complementary to) Riak.

Part one covered the main reason for building Riak search: clients have built applications that eventually need to find data by value, not just by key. This is difficult, if not impossible, in a key/value store.

Part two described the shape of the final solution we set out to create. The goal of Riak Search is to support the Lucene interface, with Lucene syntax support and Solr endpoints, but with the operations story of Riak. This means that Riak Search will scale easily by adding new machines, and will continue to run after machine failure.

Part three was an introduction to Inverted Indexing, which is the heart of all search systems, as well as the difference between Document-Partitioning and Term-Partitioning, which forms the ongoing battle in the distributed search field. Part three continued with a deep-dive into parsing, planning, and executing the search query on Erlang.

Slides: http://www.slideshare.net/rklophaus/riak-search-erlang-factory-london-2010

Building a Scalable E-commerce Framework – Michael Nordström and Daniel Widgren

Michael Nordström and Daniel Widgren presented an Erlang-based e-commerce framework on behalf of their project team from Uppsala University (Christian Rennerskog, Shahzad Gul, Nicklas Nordenmark,
Manzoor Ahmad Mubashir, Mikael Nordström, Kim Honkaniemi, Tanvir Ahmad, Yujuan Zou, and Daniel Widgren) and their industrial partner, Klarna AB.

The application uses a “LERN stack” (Linux, Erlang, Riak, Nitrogen), to provide a reusable web shop that can be quickly set up by clients, customized via templates and themes, and extended via plugins to support different payment providers.

The project is currently going a rewrite to update to the latest versions of Riak and Nitrogen.

GitHub: http://github.com/mino4071/CookieCart-2.0

Twitter: @Cookie_Cart

Clash of the Titans: Erlang Clusters and Google App Engine – Panos Papadopoulos, Jon Vlachoyiannis, Nikos Kakavoulis

Panos, Jon, and Nikos took turns describing the technical evolution of their startup, SocialCaddy, and why they were forced to move away from the Google App Engine. SocialCaddy is a tool that mines your online profiles for important events and changes, and tells you about them. For example, if a friend gets engaged, SocialCaddy will tell you about it, and assist you in sending a congratulatory note.

Google App Engine imposes a 30 second limit on requests. As SocialCaddy processed larger and larger social graphs, they bumped into this limit, which made GAE unusable as a platform. In response, the team developed Erlust, which allows you to submit jobs (written in any language) to a cluster. An Erlang application coordinates the jobs, and each job should read from a queue, process messages, and write to another queue.

Using Open-Source Trifork QuickCheck to test Erjang – Kresten Krab Thorup

Kresten Krab Thorup (CTO of Trifork) stirred up dust when he originally announced his intention to build a version of Erlang that ran on the JVM. Since then, he has made astounding progress. Erjang turns Erlang .beam files into Java .class files, now supporting a broad enough feature set to run Mnesia over distributed Erlang. Kresten claimed performance matching (or at times exceeding) that of the Erlang VM.

Erjang is still a work in progress, there are many BIFs that still need to be ported, but if a prototype exists to prove viability, then this prototype was certainly a success. One slide showed the code for the spawn_link function reimplemented in Java in ~15 lines of simple Java code.

For the second half of his talk, Kresten showed off Triq (short for Trifork Quickcheck), a scaled-down, open-source QuickCheck inspired testing framework that he built in order to test Erjang. Triq supports basic generators (called domains), value picking, and shrinking. Kresten showed examples of using Triq to validate that Erjang performs binary operations with the exact same results as Erlang.

More information about Erjang here: http://wiki.github.com/krestenkrab/erjang/

Day 2 – June 11, 2010

Efene: A Programming Language for the Erlang VM – Mariano Guerra

Mariano Guerra presented Efene, a new language that is translated into Erlang source code. Efene is intended to help coax developers into the world of Erlang who might otherwise be intimidated by the Prolog-inspired syntax of Erlang. We’ve heard about a number of other projects compiling into Erlang byte-code (such as Reia and Lisp-Flavored Erlang), but Efene takes a different approach in that the language is parsed and translated using Leex and Yecc into standard Erlang code, which is then compiled as normal. By doing this, Mariano manages to leave most of the heavy lifting of optimizations to the existing Erlang compiler.

Efene actually supports two different syntax flavors, one with curly brackets, the other without, leading to a syntax that feels vaguely like Javascript or Python, respectively. (The syntax without curly brackets is called Ifene, for “Indented Efene”, and is otherwise identical to Efene.)

In some places, Efene syntax is a bit more verbose than Erlang. This is done to make the language more readable than Erlang. (“if” and “case” statements have more structure in Efene than Erlang.) In other places, Efene requires less typing, multi-claused function definitions don’t require you to repeat the function name, for example.

Code samples and more information: http://marianoguerra.com.ar/efene

Erlang in Embedded Systems – Gustav Simonsson, Henrik Nordh, Fredrik Andersson, Fabian Bergstrom, Niclas Axelsson and Christofer Ferm

Gustav, Henrik, Fredrik, Fabian, Niclas, and Christofer (Uppsala University), in cooperation with Erlang Solutions, worked on a project to shrink the Erlang VM (plus the Linux platform on which it runs) down to the smallest possible footprint for use on Gumstix and BeagleBoard hardware.

The team experimented with OpenEmbedded and Angstrom, using BusyBox, uClibc, and stripped .beam files to further decrease the footprint. During the presentation, they played a video showing how to install Erlang on a Gumstix single-board computer in 5 minutes using their work.

More information about Embedded Erlang here: http://embedded-erlang.org

Zotonic: Easy Content Management with Erlang’s Performance and Flexibility – Marc Worrell

Marc Worrell (WhatWebWhat) breaks CMSs into:

  • 1st Generation – Static text and images
  • 2nd Generation – Database- and template-driven systems (covers current CMS systems)
  • 3rd Generation – Highly interactive, real-time, personalized data exchanges and frameworks

Zotonic is aimed squarely at the third generation, Zotonic turns a CMS into a living, breathing thing, where modules on a page talk to each other and other sessions via comet, and the system can be easily extended, blurring the line between CMS and application framework.

This interactivity is what motivated Marc to write the system in Erlang; at one point he compared the data flowing through the system to a telephone exchange. Zotonic uses Webmachine, Mochiweb, ErlyDTL, and a number of other Erlang libraries, with data in PostgreSQL. (Marc also mentioned Nitrogen as an early inspiration for Zotonic, parts of Zotonic are based on Nitrogen code, though much has been rewritten.)

The data model is physically simple, with emergent functionality. A site is developed in terms of objects (called pages) interlinked with other objects. In other words, from a data perspective, adding an image to a web page is the same as linking from a page to a subpage, or tagging a page with an author. Mark gave a live demo of Zotonic’s ability to easily add and change menu structures, modify content, and add and re-order images. Almost everything can be customized using ErlyDTL templates. Very polished stuff.

Marc then introduced his goal of “Elastic Zotonic”, a Zotonic that can scale in a distributed, fault-tolerant, “buzzword-compliant” way, which will involve changes to the datastore and some of the architecture.

Marc is now working with Maximonster to develop an education-oriented social network on top of Zotonic.

More information: http://zotonic.com

Closing Session

Francesco (CSO, Erlang Solutions, Ltd.) thanked the sponsors, presenters, and audience. Frank then gave a big special thanks to Frank Knight and Joanna Włodarczyk, who both worked tirelessly to organize the conference and make everything go smoothly.

Final Thoughts

Erlang is gaining momentum in the industry as a platform that enables you to solve distributed, massively concurrent problems. People aren’t flocking directly to Erlang itself, they are instead flocking to projects built in Erlang, such as RabbitMQ, ejabberd, CouchDB, and of course, Riak. At the same time, other languages are adopting some of the key features that make Erlang special, including a message-passing architecture and lightweight threads.